Tag Archive for vSphere

NanoLab – Index of Tekhead.it Posts on Intel NUC VMware vSphere Homelabs

Starting in January 2013, my Intel NUC series is now over has reached the heady heights of double digits over the past few years, so I figured it might be handy to make them a bit easier to find!

Nanolab Posts

More posts coming soon… 🙂

Just in case I forget to keep this page updated:
http://tekhead.it/blog/category/nanolab/

Intel NUC Nanolab blog posts

Quick Fix for “The task was canceled by a user” when deploying OVA in vCenter 6

The task was cancelled by a user

So I came across a very odd vCenter bug today when trying to deploy an OVA file on vSphere 6.0, specifically the latest CoreOS image.

The import was repeatedly failing with the same error message.

What was more frustrating was the fact that the error message was “The task was cancelled by a user”, which it blatantly was not!

Error log example below:

OVA Import Errors

OVA Import Errors

A quick bit of testing and Googling and I came across an article by my good friend Ather Beg from the LonVMUG, who had a very simple fix for the same issue in vSphere 5.5.

  1. Install 7-zip or a similar archiving tool
  2. Extract the OVA file using 7-zip into its component parts
  3. Import into vCenter, selecting the OVF file for the import target

That’s it – simples!

Success!

Success!

What’s really weird is that after importing the OVF successfully, I then went back and imported the OVA, and it worked fine!

Very strange indeed…

VCP6-DCV Delta Exam (2V0-621D) Study Guide and Exam Experience

Having successfully completed the VCP6-DCV Delta Exam (2V0-621D) this week, I thought it would be worthwhile jotting down a few thoughts on the exam, and noting the resources I used to prepare for it.

I’ve previously completed the VCP3, VCP4 and VCP5 “DCV” exams, however being specifically a delta exam, this one was a little different. The exam primarily covers the differences between vSphere 5 and vSphere 6, with a handful of seemingly more general questions.

For summary impressions of the exam (i.e. the TLDR), jump to the end of this article! 🙂

Preparation
I used the following resources in prep for the exam:

homelab

The Exam
The exam itself was different to any previous VCP exam I’ve done. I would say that because the scope of the exam was much narrower, the depth of the questions seemed to me to be significantly more, with a few really tricky ones thrown in there.

Over all if I was to do it again (and when it comes time to do the VCP7 in a few years) I would probably just do the full VCP exam, rather than the delta. That way you can be sure of a decent number of the easy peasy questions which will probably be on stuff you’ve been doing for years, as well as the new stuff you may not know quite as well.

Obviously having not done the full VCP6 exam I can’t say this for sure, but I would say it’s a pretty good bet.

NanoLab – Part 10 – Your NUCs are nice and cool, but what about your stick?

I have been running a variety of Intel NUC nodes in my vSphere homelab over the past 3 years now, including the D34010WYKH, DC3217IYE & DC53427HYE.

In that time I have unfortunately seen more than my fair share of USB drive failures and corruptions, generally with an error which looks something like this:

Error loading /k.b00
Fatal error: 33 (Inconsistent data)

 
These are not cheap and nasty, or freebie USB drives, so I would not normally expect to see this rate of failures. The error only occurs when you reboot the host, and the startup bombs out at the start of the hypervisor launch. I have often managed to recover the stick by copying back corrupted files from another instance, but generally I needed to rebuild and restore the image. An unnecessary pain in the rear!

The Root Cause
The NUC case can become quite warm during normal operation with or without the fans spinning up, and I have come to believe that the main reason for the corruptions is that the USB stick itself is getting too hot and therefore eventually failing. Having pulled a USB out from a recently shut down node, they are really quite hot to the touch. You don’t actually see the symptom / failure until a reboot because the ESXi image actually runs in memory, so is only loaded from the USB stick at boot time.

The Solution
As for the solution, it’s really quite simple. I purchased a number of 12cm (5 inch) USB 2.0 extender cables on eBay for just 99p each (including delivery!).

These keep the USB stick indirectly attached to the NUC chassis, and as such the heat does not transfer into the flash drive. Since doing this I have not seen any further issues with the corruptions. Job done!

Keeping things cool: USB extender on Intel NUC

Keeping things cool: USB extender on Intel NUC

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