Tag Archive for London

AWS for VMware Admins – London VMUG Slide Deck

Last week, Chris Porter and I did a presentation at the London VMUG on AWS for VMware admins, a simple beginners guide with a few gotchas and tips we’ve picked up along our journeys to the public cloud.

The session itself was pretty well received, and we were lucky enough to have standing room only attendance (it was a very small room! 🙂 ).

To open up proceedings and get a feel for our audience, we ran a quick survey of the 50 or so VMware professionals who were in attendance, and the results were pretty interesting.

To the question “Have you played with AWS before?”, over half of the room raised their hands, though with a caveat from one attendee who asked if creating the account qualifies! (You know who you are!)

“Do you have any AWS experience on the job?” saw a number of hands drop, and perhaps 30-40% of the room said yes.

What was most interesting was that to the penultimate question “Are you using AWS in Production today?”, only a single hand in the room remained raised!

Finally, we asked “Are you planning to do any AWS certs in the next 12 months?” and the resounding answer from over 60%-70% of the audience was a clear yes!

Conclusions

So what conclusions can we draw from this straw poll?

Seemingly most of the attendees were either using AWS for dev/test or simply playing with it in the work lab, however with a clear preference to complete certs this year, the future is certainly looking a lot more cloudy for your average VMware administrator, either in their current organisation, or perhaps even elsewhere!

Slide Deck

Anyway, enough jibber jabbing! You can find a copy of the slide deck below:

AWS for VMware Admins Deck

If you were unable to make the session and happen to be in or around Glasgow on April 20th, we will hopefully be doing a repeat!

Further Reading

If you want to find out more about AWS, certification, etc, I have a load of additional resources and posts available here:

Index of Tekhead.it Blog Posts on Amazon AWS

Juxtaposition Time! Join us at London VMUG to talk AWS! – January 19th 2017

Don’t panic, you’re not imagining things! You did indeed read that title right! If everything goes to plan, Chris Porter and I will be taking the January 2017 London VMUG to a whole new place, with a session on AWS!

Yes, that’s an AWS session at a VMUG! 😮

Why?

For those people who have been living in a bunker on the isle of Arran for the past few years, AWS has been taking the IT industry by storm. So much so, at VMworld 2016, VMware announced their new product “VMware Cloud on AWS“!

Whatever the reasons that VMware have decided to do this (and I’m not going to go into my opinions of that right now), it leaves VMware admins in a position where even if they aren’t already doing some AWS today, the likelihood of them doing so in the near future has just jumped by an order of magnitude!

Meanwhile in a parallel universe...

Meanwhile in a parallel universe…

What’s the session about then?

The session is planned to be a quick intro on the key features of AWS, some tips on how to learn more and get certified, as well as some of Chris and my experiences of working with and designing for AWS (which is rather different to doing things in VMware, for sure!).

Hopefully it should be a pretty interesting session, especially if you haven’t had much exposure to AWS yet!

What else can you see at the event?

As always, there will be many awesome speakers at the London VMUG event. Ricky El-Quasem is even doing two by himself!

There will also be a load of other sessions, so check out the agenda below:

LonVMUG Jan 2017Wrapping up the event there will also be the eponymous vBeers event at the Old Bank of England (194 Fleet St, London EC4A 2LT), so make sure you hang around after and join us for what is often the best part of the day!

Lastly, thanks very much to the LonVMUG sponsors, Rubrik, iLand and Stormagic, without whom it would not be possible to hold these events!

I’m in! How do I register?

You can register for the event at the London VMUG workspace here:

LonVMUG January 2017 Registration

The location is techUK, 10 St Bride St, London, EC4A, which is pretty easy to get to via your preferred public transport methods, though coming in via Waterloo I generally find the bus to be fastest…

If you do see me on the day (I’m 6’7” so you cant miss me), please do come and say hi! 🙂

Free vSphere 6 Training! (Yes this title is blatant click bait!)

Yes I fully admit that this article is click bait, but i can promise you that attending the event below will help you learn all about VMware’s latest and greatest release (and a few other things besides), as well as having the opportunity to network with some awesome like-minded individuals!

The event agenda is below and follows the usual mix of vendor sponsors and top notch community sessions, followed by a couple of cheeky lemonades at the vBeers event at the Pavilion End at the end of the day.

As an added bonus it seems that the night before the meeting, the crew from TECHUnplugged will be in town and everyone is invited to a vWhatever session (vBeers, vWine, vCurry, vWhatever!), location TBC. Keep an eye on Jane Rimmer’s blog for more info!

London VMUG 23rd April 2015 Agenda

I am hoping to be at the event, having only missed one in about the last 3 years, so if you do spot me there (I’m the 6’7” Scottish bloke”)!

Public Speaking Tips for Tech Talks and #VMUG Sessions

Keep Calm and Speak at a VMUG

Public speaking can be daunting if you don’t do it regularly (and sometimes, even if you do!). As part of my role I regularly talk to small groups of 5-10 people, but this year I have had the opportunity to speak a couple of times at the London VMUG.

The following tips are a combination of my own experience, both where I think things in my sessions went well, and equally where I could definitely have improved. Many thanks to Mike Laverick, Simon Gallagher, Andrew Audsley and Mark Wilson for their presenting and technical tips as well!

Presentation Tips

  • Facts, figures, best practices and suggested configurations are interesting, but sharing of real life experiences is what people come to hear. Anecdotes are much more interesting.
  • Talking about what works and what went well is great, but issues or things that didn’t quite work out as you expected are just as valuable, if not more so.
  • Gauging the audiences level of knowledge / experience early on can be very helpful. The first thing I did in my last presentation was to ask how many people in the room worked with or designed storage on a regular basis. As it was a “Noddy’s Guide”, I was expecting few hands, but in fact ¾ of the room put their hand up! The advantage of asking this up front is that I was able to tweak my session to the audience by dropping or de-emphasizing a lot of the simpler stuff and concentrating on the more complex / interesting bits.
  • By talking about what you did / would do in a scenario, as opposed what you think other people should do, they are be more likely to be receptive. This subtle difference can change the feel of a session from being a lecture, into a discussion. If the intention of the session is to get people to interact, this might encourage people to step up and say what they would do in the same situation, or to talk about their experiences.
  • If you are not 100% sure of / expert in all of your content, consider including “islands” of content at regular intervals (e.g. every 10-15 minutes), where you know the content really well. This means if you happen to start to drift and lose your way a bit, you can anchor to the bits you know really well and build your confidence back up before moving on to the next bit of the presentation.
  • Don’t be off put if you don’t get a huge amount of interaction, especially with large groups. The bigger the audience, the less interaction you are likely to get, unless you specifically ask for it or start picking on audience members!
VMUG Audiences Are Friendly!

Dont worry… VMUG audiences are friendly!

  • Don’t be nervous about the audience! Much like a wedding speech, its worth remembering that the VMUG audience at a community session really want the speaker to succeed. It’s unlikely you will find a more friendly and willing audience in almost any other situation.
  • Lists are not exciting, and neither are multiple slides of “and another thing” type of comments. I definitely felt I should have tried to break up my last session into different types of content and context, which would have made it more interesting.
  • Even if you plan your presentation to the minute in advance, things never quite work out that way! You are likely to be asked questions, stopped mid flow, projectors turn themselves off and start smelling a bit smoky etc… the best thing to do is plan a shorter presentation as you will undoubtedly use all the time anyway!
  • When it comes to slides less is most definitely more!
  • You don’t actually have to go through every line on every slide, sometimes simply picking out the most pertinent bits can make for better flow, and the decks are usually available after anyway, so someone who is really interested can read the detail if they want to.
  • One other tip which Duncan Epping gave recently and I definitely agree with is to practice your presentation a few times through in advance, but don’t over-practice and end up being too robotic. Everyone has their own style but I personally like to use the slides as a talking point and guide, rather than planning word-for-word what I’m going to say.
  • Once you have your initial draft, try it out on some friends or colleagues in the industry. This can be invaluable for working out your timing and getting a feel for what works and what doesn’t. I ended up rewriting large chunks of my storage presentation after running through it with some guys from my team at work.
  • Don’t forget about the awesome FeedForward initiative! I was fortunate enough to have the inimitable Mike Laverick provide me with FeedForward prior to both of my London VMUG sessions, and in both cases he provided lots of valuable suggestions and improvements to my content and style as well as coming up with a few ideas I hadn’t even considered.

Tech Tips

  • As I have painfully discovered first hand, no matter how much prep and testing I did on my slide deck, it still went wrong! From now on I plan to have a backup plan; a PDF copy I can whip out if PowerPoint goes nuts again!
  • Don’t use PowerPoint animations… they’re unreliable at best!
Sacrifice to the Gods of Demos

Sacrifice to the Gods of Demos

  • If you are going to do a live demo, don’t forget to sacrifice an old laptop, phone, printer or other electronic device to the gods of Demos! [Alternatively, you could just record a copy of your demo in case it all goes wrong then you have a backup plan].
    A prime example of this (and I’m sure he won’t mind me sharing it) was our London VMUG’s very own Simon Gallagher who was doing a software demo. He tested it successfully just minutes before his presentation was due to start. During his presentation the demo then decided to fail! After a bit of investigation, Simon realised that the license key on his software ran out in the few minutes between his last test, and his live demo starting. Talk about unlucky timing?!
  • [Mac] Mirroring screen contents instead of using presenter view tends to work more consistently, rather than extending the desktop to the projector. In my day-to-day work this is what I have always done and its always worked very reliably. It does mean you can’t use speaker notes though of course.
  • [Mac] Consider running PowerPoint in Parallels or Fusion on Windows. The Windows version of PowerPoint is apparently more consistent!

If you have any more tips or suggestions you think would be worth adding to the list, please feel free to contact me and I’ll be happy to add them for the benefit of others!

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