Tag Archive for startup

StorageOS – An array based on containers? It’s like storage for millenials!

Last week I managed to catch up with the guys from StorageOS, a new container-based storage company, headquartered in London. I found out about them at a London Storage Beers event a few weeks ago, and my first question was, what the hell is container-based storage, and how does it work?!

They started from the premise (yes that’s actually the correct use of the word premise!), that if you want to build a storage system FOR containers, what better way to do it than to build it FROM containers. StorageOS therefore offer what they describe as “full enterprise storage array functionality, delivered by software, on a pay-as-you-go basis”. They also plan to offer a free-forever Developer tier, which includes everything except HA functionality which you would obviously need for production usage!

StorageOS Announcement

So the good news is, today (Monday 20th June 2016) StorageOS are announcing the release of their Beta at DockerCon, so you can now download and test out their new storage platform.

The StorageOS Stack

The StorageOS Stack

 

You can deploy this StorageOS software anywhere from bare metal to containers:

StorageOS - It's software, so it runs anywhere!

It’s software, so it runs anywhere!

Appliances for some of the larger clouds are in the works, but will not be available on day zero.

They can then consume any back-end storage, from SSD, HDDs and virtual drives, to EBS volumes, object stores, etc. You then pool all of capacity from all devices into a capacity pool, which is deduped, encrypted, and available across all nodes, and carve out volumes to present to systems like Docker through their own native Docker driver, or (slightly oddly) iSCSI / FC!!! They even have VAAI support in development!

Overall, I think it’s a pretty interesting product. At first look it feels a bit like a traditional array in a container package, much like if you containerised an enterprise app, then just utilised as a traditional array with some container plugins, instead of being very targeted and container-specific. StorageOS do have an OS driver to let you mount their volumes direct from containers, but there are other things out there today which do that anyway (e.g. Flocker).

I would say their messaging is a little inconsistent at the moment, and adding things like FC integration early on feels a bit odd if they’re positioning themselves as a container play. They do however state clearly that they’re targeting enterprises and want to make the on-boarding process as simple and friction-less as possible. I do worry that this “all things to all people” approach could be a wee bit risky at this early stage, and being more laser focused in the short to medium term would allow them to differentiate more.

StorageOS Cloud

The founders were very specific when they stated that they were building a clustered array with synchronous remote replicas, not a distributed storage array. Async replication is coming, which will be critical to maintaining performance in a hybrid cloud or multi-cloud setup. I really like the fact that you can stretch the same hybrid storage environment between your on-premises and cloud infrastructure using a single storage solution. This same solution can actually be used to span multiple public clouds as well, providing a resilient storage solution between say AWS and Azure, all of which is deduped and encrypted of course! This could be very interesting indeed, as customers look to protect their workloads from large public outages!

Finally, the StorageOS software is built (as you would expect these days) with APIs at the heart of everything. Even the modern GUI is really just based on API calls to the back end.

The Tekhead Take

Anyway, enough gabbing… It’s still early days, but the storage experience of the founders is certainly solid! Who better than ex-storage admins to provide a product that works well for storage admins?! I’d say there’s a good chance of this becoming a pretty cool product in the future, so definitely one to watch!

You can find a link to their website and beta sign up here:
http://storageos.com/index.php/product/

StorageOS hipster-approved storage

Tech Startup Spotlight – Hedvig

Hedvig

After posting this comment last week, I thought it might be worth following up with a quick post. I’ll be honest and say that until Friday I hadn’t actually heard of Hedvig, but I was invited along by the folks at Tech Field Day to attend a Webex with this up and coming distributed storage company, who have recently raised $18 million in their Series B funding round, having only come out of stealth in March 2015.

Hedvig are a “Software Defined Storage” company, but in their own words they are not YASS (Yet Another Storage Solution). Their new solution has been in development for a number of years by their founder and CEO Avinash Lakshman; the guy who invented Cassandra at Facebook as well as Amazon Dynamo, so a chap who knows about designing distributed systems! It’s based around a software only distributed storage architecture, which supports both hyper-converged and traditional infrastructure models.

It’s still pretty early days, but apparently has been tested to up to 1000 nodes in a single cluster, with about 20 Petabytes, so it would appear to definitely be reasonably scalable! 🙂 It’s also elastic, as it is designed to be able to shrink by evacuating nodes, as well as add more. When you get to those kind of scales, power can become a major part to your cost to serve, so it’s interesting to note that both x86 and ARM hardware are supported in the initial release, though none of their customers are actually using the latter as yet.

In terms of features and functionality, so far it appears to have all the usual gubbins such as thin provisioning, compression, global deduplication, multi-site replication with up to 6 copies, etc; all included within the standard price. There is no specific HCL from a hardware support perspective, which in some ways could be good as it’s flexible, but in others it risks being a thorn in their side for future support. They will provide recommendations during the sales cycle though (e.g. 20 cores / 64GB RAM, 2 SSDs for journalling and metadata per node), but ultimately it’s the customer’s choice on what they run. Multiple hypervisors are supported, though I saw no mention of VAAI support just yet.

The software supports auto-tiering via two methods, with hot blocks being moved on demand, and a 24/7 background housekeeping process which reshuffles storage at non-busy times. All of this is fully automated with no need for admin input (something which many admins will love, and others will probably freak out about!). This is driven by their philosophy or requiring as little human intervention as possible. A noteworthy goal in light of the modern IT trend of individuals often being responsible for concurrently managing significantly more infrastructure than our technical forefathers! (See Cats vs Chickens).

Where things start to get interesting though is when it comes to the file system itself. It seems that the software can present block, file and object storage, but the underlying file system is actually based on key-value pairs. (Looks like Jeff Layton wasn’t too far off with this article from 2014) They didn’t go into a great deal of detail on the subject, but their architecture overview says:

“The Hedvig Storage Service operates as an optimized key value store and is responsible for writing data directly to the storage media. It captures all random writes into the system, sequentially ordering them into a log structured format that flushes sequential writes to disk.”

Supported Access Protocols
Block – iSCSI and Cinder
File – NFS (SMB coming in future release)
Object – S3 or SWIFT APIs

Working for a service provider, my first thought is generally a version of “Can I multi-tenant it securely, whilst ensuring consistent performance for all tenants?”. Neither multi-tenancy of the file access protocols (e.g. attaching the array to multiple domains for different security domains per volume) nor storage performance QoS are currently possible as yet, however I understand that Hedvig are looking at these in their roadmap.

So, a few thoughts to close… Well they definitely seem to be a really interesting storage company, and I’m fascinated to find out more as to how their key-value filesystem works in detail.  I’d suggest they’re not quite there yet from a service provider perspective, but for private clouds in the the enterprise market, mixed hypervisor environments, and big data analytics, they definitely have something interesting to bring to the table. I’ll certainly be keeping my eye on them in the future.

For those wanting to find out a bit more, they have an architectural white paper and datasheet on their website.

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