Tag Archive for Oracle

Now that’s what I call… Tech Predictions 2017

predictions

At this time of year, it is customary to look back at the past 12 months and make some random or not-so-random guesses as to what will happen over the coming 12. As such, what could be more fitting for my final post of 2016?!

Here’s a few of my personal best, worst, and easy guess candidates for 2017…

Tekhead Predictable Tech Predictions 2017

Easy Guesses

Come on Alex, even Penfold could have predicted these!

  • AWS will continue to dominate the cloud market, though the rate at which they deploy new features will start to slow (over 1000 a year is pretty unsustainable!). Their revenues will continue to grow at gangbuster rates, however their market share will be slightly eroded as people experiment more with their competitors too.
  • Microsoft Azure will grow massively (not quite 100% but not far off it). Their main growth will probably be in hosting enterprises and typical line of business applications as people move their legacy junk into the cloud. The recent announcements of the Single Instance VM SLA of 99.9% will definitely accelerate this as customers will feel less include to refactor their applications for cloud.
  • Distributed everything!
  • Docker will start to become more mainstream production and less Dev/Test.
  • Google will kill off at least one popular service with multiple millions of users.
  • The homelab market will reduce as people do more and more of their studying in the cloud.
  • Podcasting will become the new blogging (if it hasn’t already!)
  • DellEMC will continue to hack off bits of its anatomy to pay back that cheeky little $67Bn debt.
  • I continue to use memes as a crutch to make my otherwise lifeless articles marginally more interesting!obvious
Best Guesses

Its on the cards… maybe?

  • Google will continue to be ignored by most enterprises for Cloud IaaS. They will gain some reasonable growth in the web application space after another mass marketing activity to developers, ISVs and hosters.
  • Oracle grows Cloud revenues 50% or more but market share remains small. Their growth is mainly driven by IaaS revenue as customers begin to move their workloads to be closer to their data in the Oracle PaaS and SaaS services.
  • There will be no major storage company IPO in 2017, i.e. over $200m.
  • Many storage startups will run out of funding and die on the vine (depressing I know!). Their IP will be snapped up by the old guard storage companies in the proceeding fire sales…
    fire-sale
  • 3D XPoint will begin to creep into storage arrays by the end of the year, fuelling another storage VC funding bubble for at least another 12 months for any company who claims to have an innovative way to use it.
  • A major cloud provider suffers a global outage.
Worst Guesses

These probably won’t happen, but if any of them do, I’ll claim smugly that I knew they were always going to!

  • Pure Storage will make an acquisition of a storage startup to create their third product line, perhaps a secondary storage company (i.e. not just all flash) along the lines of Cohesity.
  • Cisco will buy a storage company. They will be more successful at integrating it than they were with Whiptail! (Which wouldn’t be difficult… 😮 )
  • Spanning a single application over multiple clouds becomes a real possibility, as one or more startups come out of stealth to provide innovative ways to span clouds. Nobody buys into it, except maybe for DR.
  • Tekhead.it becomes the most read blog in the world in 2017
  • Cats take over the planet and dogs are forced to form a rebel alliance which is ultimately victorious when a chihuahua takes out the entire cat leadership in one go, with a stolen reaper drone.Cats vs Dogs
  • Jonah Hill wins Strictly Come Dancing, narrowly defeating Frankie Boyle and Charlie Brooker in the final.
And finally…

Here’s wishing you all an awesome, fun and prosperous 2017!

Software Defined Storage Virtualisation – How useful is that then?

Ignoring the buzzword bingo post title, storage virtualisation is not a new thing (and for my American cousins, yes, it should be spelt with an s! 🙂 ).

NetApp have for example been doing a V-Series controller for many years which could virtualise pretty much any storage you stick in the back of it. It would then present it as NFS and layer on all of the standard ONTAP features.

The big advantage then was that you can use the features which might otherwise be missing from your primary or secondary storage tiers, as well as being able to mix and match different tiers of storage from the same platform.

In a previous role, we had an annual process to full backup and restore a 65TB Oracle database from one site to another over a rather slow link, using an ageing VTL that could just about cope with incrementals and not much more on a day to day basis. End to end this process took a month!

Then one year we came up with a plan to used virtualised NFS storage to do compressed RMAN backups, replicate the data using snap mirror and restore on the other side. It took us 3 days; an order of magnitude improvement!

That was 4 years ago, when the quantity of data globally was about 4x less than it is now; the problem of data inertia is only going to get worse as the worlds storage consumption doubles roughly every two years!

What businesses need is the flexibility to use a heterogeneous pool of storage of different tiers and vendors in different locations to move our data around as required to meet our current IT strategy, without having to change paths to data or take downtime (especially on non virtualised workloads which don’t have the benefits of Storage vMotion etc). These tiers need to provide the consistent performance defined by individual application requirements.

It’s for this reason that I was really interested in the presentation from Primary Data at Storage Field Day 8. They were founded just two years ago, came out of stealth at VMworld 2015, and plan to go GA with their first product in less than a month’s time. They also have some big technical guns in the form of their Chief Scientist, the inimitable Steve Wozniak!

One of the limitations of the system I used in the past was that it was ultimately a physical appliance, with all the usual drawbacks thereof. Primary Data are providing the power to abstract data services based on software only, presented in the most appropriate format for the workload at hand (e.g. for vSphere, Windows, Linux etc), so issues with data gravity and inertia are effectively mitigated. I immediately see three big benefits:

  • Not only can we decouple the physical location of the data from it’s logical representation and therefore move that data at will, we can also very quickly take advantage of emerging storage technologies such as VVOLs.
    Some companies who shall remain nameless (and happen to have just been bought by a four letter competitor) won’t have support for VVOLs for up to another 12 months on some of their products, but with the “shim” layer of storage virtualisation from Primary Data, we could do it today on virtually any storage platform whether it is VVOL compliant or not. Now that is cool!
  • By virtualising the data plane and effectively using the underlying storage as object storage / chains of blocks, they enable additional data services which may either not be included with the current storage, or may be an expensive add-on license. A perfect example of this is sync and async replication between heterogenous devices.
    Perhaps then you could spend the bulk of your budget on fast and expensive storage in your primary DC from vendor A, then replicate to your DR site asynchronously onto cheaper storage from vendor B, or even a hyper-converged storage environment using all local server media. The possibilities are broad to say the least!
  • The inclusion of policy based Quality of Service from day one. In Primary Data parlance, they call them SLOs – Service Level Objectives for applications with specific IOPS, latency etc.
    QoS does not even exist as a concept on many recent storage devices, much to the chagrin of many service providers for example, so being able to retrofit it would protect the ROI on existing spend whilst keeping the platform services up to date.

There are however still a few elements which to me are not yet perfect. Access to SMB requires a filter driver in Windows in front of the SMB client, so the client thinks it’s talking to an SMB server but it’s actually going via the control plane to route the data to the physical block chains. A bit of a pain to retrofit to any large legacy environment.

vSphere appears to be a first class tenant in the Primary Data solution, with VASA and NFS-VAAI supported out of the “virtual” box, however it would be nice to have Primary Data as a VASA Client too, so it could read and then surface all capabilities from the underlying storage straight through to the vSphere hosts.

You will still have to do some basic administration on your storage back end to present it through to Primary Data before you can start carving it up in their “Single Pane of Glass”. If they were to create array plugins which would allow you to remote manage many common arrays this would really make that SPoG shine! (Yes, I have a feverish unwavering objection to saying that acronym!)

I will certainly be keeping an eye on Primary Data as they come to market. Their initial offering would have solved a number of issues for me in previous roles if it had been available a few years earlier, and I can definitely see opportunities where it would work well in my current infrastructure. I guess it now becomes up to the market to decide whether they see the benefits too!

Further Reading
Some of the other SFD8 delegates have their own takes on the presentation we saw. Check them out here:

Ray Lucchesi – Primary data’s path to better data storage presented at SFD8

Dan Frith – Primary Data  Because we all want our storage to do well

Disclaimer/Disclosure: My flights, accommodation, meals, etc, at Storage Field Day 8 were provided by Tech Field Day, but there was no expectation or request for me to write about any of the vendors products or services and I was not compensated in any way for my time at the event.

VMworld Europe 2015 Day Two Roundup

Doesn’t time fly by fast when you’re having fun?! Day two was frankly a full-on brain cram fest for me…

The morning started off with the keynotes, which (if I’m honest much like the US announcements) were interesting but not earth shattering for me.

It was nice to see Claranet featured for the second year running in the keynote speech though!

I will leave it to others this year to summarise the announcements, but the coolest new product which peaked my interest was vSphere Integrated Containers.

VIC is more than simply the ability to see containers running inside of a VM. In actual fact it allows you spin up containers within forked VM clones on a one to one basis, where the additional RAM and storage are copy-on-write. All this in about the same time it would normally take you to launch a standard container natively. As the VM is then subject to the usual features and benefits of a standard VM, you have the ability to control it’s access, security and performance at a very granular level.

To the developer this still uses the standard docker interface, but the infrastructure admin can manage things through vCenter as they always have done. Of course this means you are also subject to the usual limits on vSphere (for example up to 10k objects per vCenter), so this is not hyper scale, but lets be honest, how many of us are actually doing that? VMware also have a solution for this scale, Photon platform, but I’ll save that for another day.

I had a quick trip to the VMware Video Game Container System later in the day where I had the opportunity to spend 20 minutes chatting with one of the VMware CNA Product Managers about some of their roadmap developments, and suffice to say the future looks very impressive! They also demo’d the ability to containerise virtually any operating system; they were actually running MS-DOS containers and Prince of Persia inside of them! If you want to learn a bit more about CNA, check out the intro blog on the VMware website:

https://blogs.vmware.com/vsphere/2015/10/vsphere-integrated-containers-technology-walkthrough.html

Later in the morning, I was kindly invited to a vExpert vRA.next Workshop in the HoL where we were lead through the latest features and improvements in vRealize Automation. There certainly seemed to be something for everyone, significant improvements in the speed and method to deploy which made a lot of people very happy, as well as a rationalisation of the server roles. The only thing which was a slight downer for me was the fact that true multi tenancy is not quite there yet in the product.

After a quick bite to eat, including some English Bread Triangles, I managed to get a bit of time wandering round the fringes of the Solution Exchange. Hiding at the back of the hall I came across a really interesting new security startup who only recently came out of stealth and went GA just this week, called GuardiCore. Amongst many other nifty features, their software can monitor for any blocked / dropped packets from potential attackers, and immediately redirect the potentially malicious session to a honey pot machine, logging all further communications with and actions of the attacker.

GuardiCore leverage NSX in a big way, avoiding the need for agents within the guest OS, but can also work with vanilla vSphere if that’s your (more likely just now) platform. Their demo was excellent and I will definitely be keeping an eye on them in future. If you happen to be passing booth E149 I recommend you stop by for a chat, it will definitely be a good use of your time!

The afternoon was spent mostly in sessions, including the highly popular VAPP5129 – Database Virtualization: Doing IT Right with vSphere 6, presented by Michael Corey and Don Sullivan. This is a must see session if you manage DB infrastructure in any way, so check it out when it hopefully comes out on youtube or VMworld.com. Do prepare yourself to replay it several times over to capture all of the content as attending it was like being hit with a recommendation gatling gun, but the accompanying slide deck should be basic training for all new VMware admins in the field! Michael also provided the quote of the day for today:

Right sizing is everything.

 

VMworld Europe 2014 – Day Three Roundup and Closing Thoughts

Well that’s it, its all over! Having never been to a VMworld prior to this week, I have to say the event does indeed live up to the hype!

Day Three
Day three started pretty subdued, not only from the point of view of the attendees, but a couple of the presenters as well; it definitely seems people had a good time at the VMworld party the night before!

Mixing in a bit of session time with a visit to the solution exchange and a bit of Hands on Labbing was the order of the day. I did have a quite amusing chat with one of the guys working on the Oracle stand. He said that the vast majority of people who had spoken to him had berated them about licensing and support in virtual environments, along with asking why they were advertising OVM at a VMware event. I think the poor guy was not far from the end of his tether!

My last role was at Oracle, so I can fully feel the pain around the license questions as it was almost always the first thing people asked me about when I told them I worked there! It doesn’t help the fact that the latest licensing hard vs soft partitioning guide is still only from 2011!

Oracle Tastiness!

Oracle Tastiness!

One thing I will be very interested to see is what becomes the defacto stance on how many hosts you must license once share-nothing VMotion between clusters, vCenters and DCs comes along in vSphere 6. It begs the question whether any Oracle auditor might have the audacity to suggest that you need to license all hosts in all DCs?

This of course assumes that the specific auditor will not accept mandatory cluster affinity as per Richard’s comments here: http://www.licenseconsulting.eu/vmworld-tv-oracle-on-licensing-vmware-virtualized-environments-updated/

Hopefully in this scenario, common sense would prevail, but that’s deep enough down that rabbit hole for now! 🙂

The sessions I managed to attend on day 3 were as follows:

STO2521 – VSAN Best Practices
Rawlinson Rivera & Kiran Madnani provided a very useful overview of a number of example use cases and how to apply different VSAN configurations. As this was covering multiple use cases there was some repetition of content, but not so far as to be distracting. Key takeaway, when it comes to disk groups, more = better!

VSAN Use Cases

VSAN Use Cases

STO2496 – Storage Best Practices for Next-Gen Storage Platforms
Being a bit of a storage geek, for me this was one of the best sessions of the entire week. Not only entertaining, but the quantity and quality of the information was intense to say the least! A couple of key areas which they covered were around benchmarking of storage (not just using the standard 4k 100% Read profiles which vendors use to produce stats for their marketing material).

Absurd Testing at the Chad & Vaughn Show

Absurd Testing at the Chad & Vaughn Show

TEX1985 – Lessons Learned from a Real Life VSAN POC at Trend Micro
It’s always interesting to see how real customers found the use of a technology. Arsenio Mateos from Trend Micro was not particularly detailed in any specific issues they experienced, as he concentrated more on the decisions behind the solution, and the benefits it broupght them.  Cormac on the other hand was very open and when into some detail as to some of the configuration issues and bugs which were common among other customer deployments. I was also the grateful recipient of a signed copy of the book Cormac co-wrote with Duncan Epping.

EUC2027 – Characterise Performance in Horizon 6
My final session rounded out the end of the day. I don’t currently use or design VMware Horizon View in my current role, when most commonly customers have managed RDS or Citrix XenApp farms. I mainly went to the session to see the VMware approach to sizing the new session host desktops on Horizon 6. Unsurprisingly it turns out that they come out with very similar ratios and guidelines as Citrix do (shocking)!  The really interesting takeaway for me from this session was the VMware View Planner tool, which looked like it could definitely have some value in load testing and gauging the requirements for customers with or without VMware View.

By this time it was 4.30, and everything had closed. If I’m honest I was a bit gutted as I had believed the HoLs were going to be open until 6. I was most of the way through my NSX lab, so I guess I’ll just have to finish it up from home!

After the event, my remaining colleagues and I wandered into town to check out the Sagrada Familia, and grab some light refreshments + tasty tapas.

Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia

Wrapping Up
Session Surveys – The one thing I didn’t actually get done at the show (but I plan to fill in this weekend), was the session surveys. I understand these are as valuable to the speakers as to VMware, so I have no issues spending a bit of time giving feedback. If you haven’t already, then I suggest you do, especially if you want to see the same guys & gals back next year!

If I were to be able to make any suggestions to VMware for next year they would be few and far between:

  • Keep the hang space and hands on labs and/or solution exchange open until 6pm on day 3. It’s minimal extra effort but it will allow attendees to make the absolute most of the event and facilities, especially those who don’t have an early flight back the same day.
  • Make the information on getting to the event a bit easier to find on the VMworld.com site (rather than burying it in the FAQs)
  • Free Segways or (or foot massages) for all attendees!

I enjoyed a wander or two around the solution hall, but for me the best and most useful elements of the entire week were the breakout sessions (and being there live giving me the opportunity to ask questions at the end), and networking with others both in the event and at the vendor sponsored evenings.

As a side note, I will probably be creating PDFs of all of my notes and posting these on the blog imminently for anyone who may find them useful.

So finally a big thank you to everyone who made VMworld a success; the organisers, the vendors, the speakers, the HoL team and all of the people with whom I had the such interesting and entertaining discussions!

Key Stats
Number of days attended4 (including partner day)
Blog articles published6
Blogs word count
6,516
Live breakout / HoL sessions attended14
Total session notes word count10,412
Average notes word count per session743
Hands on Labs Completed2
Number of steps walkedNo idea as I don’t have a Fitbit!
Total hours slept in 4 nights< 24
Contacts madeMany
Knowledge gainedIncalculable
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