Tag Archive for Seagate

Storage Field Day 13 (SFD13) – Preview

Tech Field Day 12 (TFD12)

For those people who haven’t heard of Tech Field Day, it’s an awesome set of events run by the inimitable Stephen Foskett. The event enables tech vendors and real engineers / architects / bloggers (aka delegates) to sit down and have a conversation about their latest products, along with technology and industry trends.

Ever been reading up on a vendor’s website about their technology and had some questions they didn’t answer? One of the roles of the TFD delegates is to ask the questions which help viewers to understand the technology. If you tune in live, you can also post questions via Twitter and the delegates, who will happily ask them on your behalf!

As a delegate it’s an awesome experience as you get to spend several days visiting some of the biggest and newest companies in the industry, nerding out with like-minded individuals, and learning as much from the other delegates as you do from the vendors!

So with this in mind, I am very pleased to say that I will be joining the TFD crew for the fourth time in Denver, for Storage Field Day 13, from the 14th-16th of June!

As you can see from the list of vendors, there are some really interesting sessions coming up! Having previously met with Primary Data, it will be great to catch up with them and find out about how they have improved in the past couple of years. We also use quite a selection of DellEMC products at my organisation, so it will be really good to meet them and get the latest updates.

Lastly, I am particularly keen to find out what future trends and movements will be from the perspective of SNIA, the Storage Network Industry Association, about some of the most cutting edge developments in the industry.

SFD13 Sounds great! How do I tune in?

If you want to tune in live to the sessions, see the following link:
Storage Field Day 13

If for any reason you can’t make it live, have no fear! All of the videos are posted on YouTube and Vimeo within a day or so of the event.

My Synology DSM Blue LED issue was actually just a failed drive!

This weekend I spent several hours trying to resolve an issue with my Synology DS413j which I use for backing up my other two Synology hosts (DS412+).

I was experiencing many of the symptoms in the following post, yet I was convinced I could not have been hacked, as this server is not available to the internet! Not only that but I recently updated DSM (2-3 weeks ago) so wondered if this could be the cause?…

http://forum.synology.com/enu/viewtopic.php?f=108&t=82141

After following the full 11 step fix (minus the migratable step as it wouldn’t work), I still had a box which was unresponsive. My symptoms were:

  • Power LED light blinks blue
  • I could not log into the DSM console
  • DSM login simply says “Processing, please wait” forever or eventually times out
  • I was able to ping DSM
  • I could not reset DSM using the reset button on the back of the device
  • Booting of the device took a very long time (up to 20 mins) and Synology Assistant shows “Starting Services…” for a very long time
  • Even after following rebuild steps I could not get the Synology Assistant to show “Migratable”
  • Once booted I could see the SMB shares and access them intermittently

After much head scratching I decided to take each of the drives in turn and test them on my Windows desktop. I have 4 drives in the host, 2x Seagate and 2x WD Red. If any of them were going to fail I believed the Seagate would be at fault, so I tested those first. I plugged in disk number one, ran some tests, all ok. I then plugged in disk number two, and discovered that windows would not even mount the drive. Not only that but it was actually causing device manager to hang.

Faulty drive identified, I powered on the Synology with the remaining 3 drives only. Much to my relief, the system booted within a minute and started to beep, warning me I was missing a drive. DSM is now responding just fine.

I have now ordered a new WD Red drive to replace the failed Seagate (which was out of its very short warranty of course!).

Moral of the story: If your box looks like it may have been hit by SynoLocker but it was never on the internet, try testing all the drives in turn. You may just save yourself a few hours / days of pain!

One other wee tip is to also enable SSH access. I’m not sure if I could have logged in via SSH in the hung state, but it may have given me another troubleshooting avenue.

%d bloggers like this: