Tag Archive for Intel NUC

Quick Tip: Install a VIB into an Existing vSphere 5.5 ESXi Host

The following will likely work in other versions of vSphere, but I used it in vSphere 5.5 a while ago, then forgot to hit publish on this post!

In that case I had installed a new ESXi host and not included the custom VIB with the drivers for the SATA card. I did this deliberately as I thought I would have no need at this time to use the local HBA. The thing I forgot is that the host profiles I had created from other hosts included a local HBA, therefore the host profiles would not remediate without one. Annoying! So I used the following steps to manually add the specific VIB I needed (in this case sata-xahci-1.10-1.x86_64.vib).

SSH to your ESXi host (having enabled the SSH server from the vSphere Client):

# ssh [email protected]<hostip>
# cd /tmp

 

Copy the vib file into the host image (in my case I had it stored on my web server, but you could equally use any other standard method to get the file onto the host):

# wget http://www.tekhead.org/wp-uploads/www.tekhead.org/sata-xahci-1.10-1.x86_64.zip

 

Unzip the vib file:

# unzip sata-xahci-1.10-1.x86_64.zip

 

Install the vib:

# esxcli software vib install -v file:/tmp/sata-xahci-1.10-1.x86_64.vib
 
Installation Result
Message: The update completed successfully, but the system needs to be rebooted for the changes to be effective.
Reboot Required: true
VIBs Installed: VFrontDe_bootbank_sata-xahci_1.10-1
VIBs Removed:
VIBs Skipped:

 

Check that the vib is installed:

# esxcli software vib list | grep -i <vib name in my case ahci>
sata-xahci   1.10-1   VFrontDe   CommunitySupported   2014-10-31

 

Remove the old files (no longer needed):

# rm sata-xahci-1.10-1.x86_64.*

 

Finally, reboot your ESXi host, job done!

 

NanoLab – Part 8 – Quick Tip for Blank Screen on vPro Intel NUC

Just a very quick tip for an annoying issue I have experienced with my Intel NUC DC53427HYE and never quite found the time to look into it and find a proper fix, that is until a recent twitter conversation! Kudos and many thanks to Frank Brix Pedersen and Mads Fog Albrechtslund for finding the solution and an EU reseller, and Frank for testing and posting it on his blog site.

If you have a vPro NUC and dont connect it permanently to a screen, then when you next connect to it via the vPro remote KVM interface, you get nothing but a blank black screen.

Link to Franks post is here which explains the symptoms and fix in detail:
http://www.vfrank.org/2015/04/28/running-the-intel-nuc-headless-with-vmware-esxi/

Frank has the NUC5i5MYHE model, but the fault looks identical to the issue I have been seeing so I will be following his post and purchasing a Fit Headless dongle from Tiny Green PC for £12 (and a rather ripoff £12 postage cost unfortunately, but there don’t seem to be any other UK suppliers). It is also available from opencompany.dk for others in the EU.

I will update this post once I have tested it on the DC53427HYE!

 

NanoLab – Part 7 – VMware vSphere 6 on Intel NUC

Just one quick bit of good news relating to the recent vSphere 6 announcements… during the beta I tested the Intel 82579V adapter which comes as standard in the original generation of Intel NUCs, and found that it works out of the box in vSphere 6! Superb!

That means no more messing around with VIBs, you just install ESXi and start creating VMs!

There are a significant number of people in the community now using Intel NUC machines in their home labs for their low noise, power utilisation and cost. This may indicate VMware endeavouring to get more behind the home labbing community!

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I will post more on this when vSphere goes GA. Hopefully this support won’t change between now and then, as I believe it may have once or twice in the past…

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For more info on these brilliant devices, see other posts in this series: Intel NUC NanoLab

NanoLab – Part 6 – Keeping Your NUCs Cool (Quick Tip)

Just a very quick tip I discovered this weekend.

If you are using your Intel NUCs with any anger, they will likely run reasonably hot to the touch and typically you would just place them horizontally on a surface as per the pictures above. For optimum performance and lifespan, we all know it’s always important to keep your NUCs as cool as possible!

The NUCs are also designed to be mounted vertically on the back of a monitor/stand/wall/desk or similar, using the VESA mount. What I didn’t realise is that whether mounted or not, if you run them on their side, they seem to actually maintain lower temperatures.

I’m not sure if the same would apply for the newer generation of NUCs with the 2.5″ drive cages, which also have small vents down the side, but it certainly works on the standard models.

Vertical running of NUCs

Vertical running of NUCs

This seems to work pretty well for me, but as always, I take no responsibility if your NUC explodes with the fire of a thousand suns!

That is all.

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